How to preserve Karaunda fruit harvest as a jelly or instant dessert

Anisha
Views: 3014

Karonda Jelly No artificial color or preservative added Gluten free Vegan  Vegetarian dessert

Karaunda fruit India rooftop garden harvest

How to preserve Karaunda fruit India[1]

Ayurvedic, Vegan, Gluten-free Simple Dessert Recipe: Karaunda Jelly

Karaunda or Karonda is called Bengal currant or Christ's thorn in South India; kerenda in Malaya, nam phrom, or namdaeng in Thailand; caramba, caranda, caraunda and perunkila in the Philippines. In Lucknow we see it as a multi-purpose garden hedge that invites bees, keeps trespassers away and gives delicious fruit ready to be pickled like the Punjabi mango pickle or turned into a jelly. The Ayurvedic style of eating recommends all 6 tastes for a meal. This is my contribution for the no artificial preservative, no artificial color added sweet delight: Karonda Jelly.

I love to use my garden harvest :)

Karaunda Jelly By ,
Karaunda is a tangy fruit which grows all across India. It is drought resistant shrub quite like the Moringa tree. I preserve my Karaunda harvest in the rainy season as a jelly. The simple recipe comes to me from Late Mrs Farida Abraham, my teacher for English, Cultural History, Civics, Life, and Principal, La Martiniere Girls’ College, Lucknow.
Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Cook Time: 10 Minutes
Yield: One 400 gm Jam jar
Nutrition Facts: Rich in Calcium, Phosphorus, Iron, Ascorbic Acid and Vitamin A,
Ingredients:
- 100gm Karonda fruit deseeded
- 1 cup of Water
- 1 cup of Raw sugar
Instructions:
Simmer the deseeded Karonda fruit in half a cup of water till the fruit is soft and mushy when pressed with a spatula. Add the sugar and continue cooking a low heat, stirring occasionally to avoid sticking. When the jelly looks a rich glossy red, switch off the heat. Allow it to cool a little before storing in a glass jar or plastic-lidded ceramic container. Karonda jelly is good to add to any dessert or eaten with bread, roti, poori, pancakes and cream.



blog comments powered by Disqus



Ukhimath temple, the seat of Panch Kedar, Himalaya Photo journal

How to preserve Karaunda fruit harvest as a jelly or instant dessert

Find us on Facebook